No Appraisal Exchange In Inverse Condemnation Cases?

In an eminent domain case, the acquiring agency admits it is taking private property for a public project.   Certain aspects of eminent domain law and procedure are codified in the Code of Civil Procedure, which provisions make up the Eminent Domain Law.  One of these procedures requires that parties in an eminent domain case exchange…

Coronavirus And Eminent Domain

While sheltering in place with the rest of the world, I thought I would share some publications addressing interesting issues raised about the interplay between the government’s reaction to COVID-19 and the eminent domain law.  See below. The Government’s Authority to Condemn Property to Combat the Coronavirus.  Do Government Shutdowns for Coronavirus Invoke the Takings…

Upcoming Events

February 25, 2020 | Impact of People v. Sanchez (2016) 63 Cal. 4th 665 on Eminent Domain Evidence at Trial, IRWA Chapter 1 28th Annual Valuation Seminary, at Quiet Cannon Conference Center, 901 North Via San Clemente, Montebello March 5, 2020 | Eminent Domain 101:  An Introduction to the Law and Policy, San Diego CA …

Beware of Unintentionally Terminating a Leasehold Upon Sale

Often times, a public agency will be successful in negotiating a purchase and sale of occupied property without the need to file an eminent domain complaint.  However, unlike a simple arms-length sale and unless otherwise stated, an acquisition in lieu of eminent domain terminates the lease as a matter of law.  See Code Civ. Proc. § 1265.110 (“[w]here…

No Offer Necessary For Subsurface Waterlines Or Sewers, But Obligation To Negotiate

Normally, a public agency must make an offer to the owner based on an appraisal prior to initiating negotiations for the acquisition of real property and prior to adopting a resolution of necessity. Often overlooked, however, is that the precondemnation offer is not required when an easement is being acquired for “the construction, reconstruction, alteration,…